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Civil Society in Arab Lands: By Ballot or by Bullet?

Each time I attend a panel, workshop, forum, conference, symposium, brainstorming session, or congressional session on civil society in the United States, I am disappointed yet optimistic! I am disenchanted because at least since 9/11, the Bush administration as well as the Obama administration has not understood the ...  Read More »

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The Battle of Algeria

The departure of Tunisian leader Zine El Abidine Ben Ali in January 2011 and Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak’s resignation on February 11 sparked conjectures about Algeria as the next country in the Arab world to attempt to rid itself of authoritarian leadership. While Egyptians have lived under “state of ...  Read More »

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Morocco on the Eve of the Demonstrations

“When I go out in the street, no cares about #feb20, I connect and boom, the revolution is brewing” (Qd je sors ds la rue, no one cares about #feb20, je me connecte et boom c'est la révolution qui couve). The above, tweeted yesterday in the style of much that’s being produced on the internet about the demonstrations ...  Read More »

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Libya Erupts and Morocco Protests Planned for February 20th

The revolutionary wind is heading west as well. In addition to clashes in Benghazi, earlier today, one of al-Qadhdhafi’s murals went up in flames in al-Bayda. They chanted “It’s your turn Qadhdhafi, O dictator.”               Read More »

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Egypt, Tunisia, and 'The Resumption of Arab History'

The recent popular uprisings in Tunisia and Egypt attest above all to the indomitability of the human spirit, and the extraordinary capacity of collective action to bring out the very best in humanity. In these respects the daring, creativity, discipline, resolve, perseverance and euphoria of the people of Egypt and ...  Read More »

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Revolutionary Contagion: Morocco and a Plea for Specificity

Since January 15th, media discourse on the Arab world has almost uniformly coalesced around a single term, “contagion.” This is a telling semantic choice given the word’s broader associations with disease; a synonym for “infection” or “contamination,” it carries rhetorical connotations that are hardly subtle. The Wall ...  Read More »

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Let's Not Forget About Tunisia

Now that world attention has irresistibly moved on to the next hotspot, Egypt, it is crucially important not to forget Tunisia. In the very same manner that revolutionary change in Tunisia has spread to Egypt and Yemen and, hopefully, will continue to travel to other parts of the Arab world, any setback in Tunisia may ...  Read More »

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My Mother and My Neighbor's Dog on the Tunisian Revolution and Its Aftermath

[Take a look at this crap first] When Mohamed Bouazizi immolated himself in protest and set off a wave of much bigger protests in Tunis, and then elsewhere, speculation arose as to the extent to which the revolution will spread. Or, is it indeed a revolution? Maybe it was a mini-revolution, kind of like Sa`d, or ...  Read More »

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Tunisia's Glorious Revolution and its Implications

Last December 17th disturbances erupted in Tunisia after Mohamed Bouazizi, a young unemployed high school graduate who was condemned to sell fruits and vegetables on a street stall for a living, immolated himself in protest after authorities had beaten him and impeded him from exercising his unlicensed activity. His ...  Read More »

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Cartoons: Tunisia and Recent Events

Original cartoons for Jadaliyya by Khalil Bendib.    [Jadaliyya is inaugurating its cartoon and arts sections. We encourage the submission of cartoons and other art work. Email your material to ...  Read More »

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The Tunisian Revolution: Initial Reflections [Part 2]

[This is the second and last installment. See Part 1 here]  The revolution in Tunisia was a response to a sense of closed possibilities. Nowhere do we see any identifiable “structure of opportunities” that could have made it possible. Everywhere we see the opposite—absence of any opportunities whatsoever. The ...  Read More »

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What Happens in Tunisia Stays in Tunisia

Hope is in the air—or so it seems. The overthrow of (now) former Tunisian President Zine El-Abidine Ben Ali has created some guarded optimism among close observers of Arab politics inside and outside the region. The people of Tunisia have rid themselves of 23 years of Ben Ali’s rule, paving the way for an opportunity ...  Read More »

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The Tunisian Revolution: Initial Reflections [Part 1]

At the moment it is abundantly easy to sense everywhere in the Arab World elation at what appears to be one of greatest events in modern Arab history. A genuine popular revolution, spontaneous and apparently leaderless, yet sustained and remarkably determined, overthrew a system that by all accounts had been the most ...  Read More »

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Why, What, Where To, and How? Tunisia and Beyond

[Admittedly, I wrote this post before Bin Ali fled, and before the Tunisian protests escalated. It was kind of interrupted by the events on the ground and, so, not much due jubilation here. I added some references posthumously but kept its pre-government collapse spirit at the expense of dampening the mood: Where to? ...  Read More »

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Tunisia Unraveling: "I Got You" Was Two Decades Too Late Mr. Zein al-`Abideen

Last night (Thursday, January 13th) Zein al-`Abideen Bin `Ali addressed the Tunisian people and said: انا فهمتكم, “I got you,” or more literally, “I understood you.” I started writing this post while watching his address, and titled it “Too Late.” But I did not imagine what would transpire directly after the speech, ...  Read More »

About Maghreb Page

Jadaliyya’s Maghreb Page delivers exclusive coverage on Algeria, Libya, Mauritania, Morocco, Tunisia, and the Western Sahara. As the role of the Greater Maghreb has been pivotal in the regional movements, it is imperative that coverage remains consistent and relevant. Jadaliyya offers incisive analysis--in Arabic, French, and English--through an academic and critical perspective.

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Algeria:

Population 34,994,937
GDP $251.1 billion
Unemployment
10%; Youth Unemployment (ages 15-24): 24.3%
Military Expenditures
3.3% of GDP (World Rank: 37)
Health Expenditures
5.8% of GDP (World Rank 114)

Libya:

Population 6,597,960
GDP 
$90.57 billion
Unemployment 
30%; Youth Unemployment (ages 15-24): n/a
Military Expenditures
3.9% of GDP (World Rank: 26)
Health Expenditures
6.6% of GDP (World Rank: 89)

Mauritania:

Population 3,359,185
GDP 
$7.242 billion
Unemployment 
30% (2008); Youth Unemployment (ages 15-24): 67%
Military Expenditures
5.5% of GDP (World Rank: 12)
Health Expenditures
5.7% of GDP (World Rank: 121) 

Morocco:

Population 32,309,239
GDP 
$163 billion
Unemployment 
9.2%; Youth Unemployment (ages 15-24): 21.9%
Military Expenditures
5% of GDP (World Rank: 16)
Health Expenditures
5.5% of GDP (World Rank: 128)

Tunisia:

Population 10,629,186
GDP 
$100 billion
Unemployment 
13%; Youth Unemployment (ages 15-24): 30.7%
Military Expenditures
1.4% of GDP (World Rank: 109)
Health Expenditures
6.2% of GDP (World Rank: 100) 

Western Sahara:

Population 522,928
GDP 
$906.5 million
Unemployment 
n/a; Youth Unemployment (ages 15-24): n/a
Military Expenditures
n/a
Health Expenditures
n/a

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